Author's School

Arts & Sciences

Author's Department

Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies

Additional Affiliations

Director, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program; Adjunct Associate Professor, Department of History; Associate Professor, Department of Education; Associate Professor, Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program; Faculty with the Feminist Critical Analysis Seminar

Document Type

Journal Article

Publication Date

Fall 1993

Originally Published In

Dzuback, Mary Ann. 1993. “Professionalism, Higher Education, and American Culture: Burton J. Bledstein's the Culture of Professionalism”. Review of The Culture of Professionalism: The Middle Class and the Development of Higher Education in America. History of Education Quarterly 33 (3). [History of Education Society, Wiley]: 375–85. doi:10.2307/368198.

Abstract

Burton Bledstein classed his book The Culture of Professionalism with the work of the giants in American academik history. He suggested that his theory of the culture of professionalism ranked in significance with Frederick Jackson Turner's frontier thesis, Charles A. Beard's industrialization theories, and Perry Miller's analysis of Puritanism. Bledstein's fresh historical perspective on higher education and his skepticism regarding professional authority no doubt were shaped by his experiences at elite public and private institutions, the University of California at Los Angeles (B.A., 1959) and Princeton (Ph.D., 1967). He has spent his whole professional life at one public institution, the University of Illinois at Chicago, with brief interludes provided by fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities (1972-73) and the University of Chicago (1977-78), the latter in recognition of his book.

Pages

375-385

Comments

This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Dzuback, Mary Ann. 1993. “Professionalism, Higher Education, and American Culture: Burton J. Bledstein's the Culture of Professionalism”. Review of The Culture of Professionalism: The Middle Class and the Development of Higher Education in America. History of Education Quarterly 33 (3). [History of Education Society, Wiley]: 375-385, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.2307/368198. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

DOI

10.2307/368198

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