Author's School

Graduate School of Arts & Sciences

Author's Department/Program

Psychology

Language

English (en)

Date of Award

January 2011

Degree Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (MA)

Chair and Committee

Denise Wilfley

Abstract

Baseline parent-report of child depression and parent self-reported depression have been found to predict childrenΓÇÖs outcome in family-based behavioral weight loss treatment: FBT), although less is known about how child self-reported depression, changes in depression over time, and depression assessed via multiple informants is associated with FBT outcome. Two hundred and forty-one overweight children and their parents entered FBT, and 178 completed the pre- and post-FBT assessments. Depression was assessed via child and parent self-report, and parent-report on child. Linear regression examined child and parent depression: both baseline and change from baseline to post-FBT) as predictors of child FBT outcome: change in percent overweight). Regression models also evaluated the additive value of assessing depression via multiple informants: child and parent). Baseline depression: child self-report, parent self-report, parent-report on child) failed to significantly predict FBT outcome. In addition, the main effects of change in depression: child self-report, parent self-report, parent-report on child) were not significant. However, the interaction between baseline child self-reported depression and parent-report on child depression significantly predicted child FBT outcome. Furthermore, the interactions between change in child and parent depression significantly predicted child FBT outcome: 1) child self-reported depression change and parent self-reported depression change; and 2) child self-reported depression change and parent-report on child depression change. In the three significant models, children who experienced increased depressive symptoms and whose parents also reported an increase in depressive symptoms: either in their self-report or in their report of childrenΓÇÖs depression) exhibited the poorest FBT outcome. When evaluating depression via child self-report, parent self-report, and parent-report on child, the childrenΓÇÖs and parentsΓÇÖ self-reports did not independently predict child FBT outcome, but rather evaluating heightened depression scores on multiple measures: e.g., child self-report and parent-report on child) was significantly predictive. Early identification of and intervention for depression may enhance the tailoring of FBT and improve treatment outcome.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7936/K7TM7870

Comments

Permanent URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.7936/K7TM7870

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