Author's School

Graduate School of Arts & Sciences

Author's Department/Program

Philosophy

Language

English (en)

Date of Award

Spring 4-27-2014

Degree Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Chair and Committee

Christopher Heath Wellman

Abstract

Under what conditions can a government justifiably punish citizens for disobeying its laws? Most philosophers today think that the government can morally obligate citizens to obey the laws only if the citizens actually consent to them. This amounts to philosophical anarchism, because no extant government meets this condition. But we can provide conditions for justifiable punishment without appealing to obligation. I focus on what people may be blamed for doing, and I argue that when the government has trustworthy expertise, it can issue laws that citizens may be justifiably punished for disobeying. This condition, unlike actual consent, can be met.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.7936/K75M63T8

Comments

This work is not available online per the author’s request. For access information, please contact digital@wumail.wustl.edu or visit http://digital.wustl.edu/publish/etd-search.html.

Permanent URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.7936/K75M63T8

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