Additional Authors

Beverly, Sondra G.

Publication Date

1-4-2010

Summary

“Wilt” occurs when a young person who expects to attend college while in high school does not attend college shortly after graduating. In this study we find that youth with no account in their own name are more likely to experience wilt than any other group examined. In multivariate analysis, youth who expect to graduate from a four-year college and have an account are approximately seven times more likely to attend college than youth who have no account. Youth who expect to graduate from a four-year college and have designated a portion of their savings for college are approximately four times more likely to attend college than youth who have no account. Additionally, when savings is taken into account, academic achievement is no longer a significant predictor of college attendance. Policy implications are discussed.

Document Type

Working Paper

Category

Financial Inclusion

Subarea

Asset Building

Notes

Subsequent publication: Elliott, W., III, & Beverly, S. (2011). The role of savings and wealth in reducing “wilt” between expectations and college attendance. Journal of Children & Poverty, 17(2), 165–185. doi:10.1080/10796126.2011.538375

Original Citation

Elliott, W., III, & Beverly, S. (2010). The role of savings and wealth in reducing "wilt" between expectations and college attendance (CSD Working Paper No. 10-01). St. Louis, MO: Washington University, Center for Social Development.

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.7936/K76M36BD

Keywords

college expectations, college enrollment, child savings account, child development account, CDA, PSID, savings

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