Searchable Title

Optimising Measurement of Health-Related Characteristics of the Built Environment: Comparing Data Collected by Foot-Based Street Audits, Virtual Street Audits and Routine Secondary Data Sources. Copyright: Creative Commons License.

Reference Type

Journal Article

Authors, Section

Pliakas, T.; Hawkesworth, S.; Silverwood, R. J.; Nanchahal, K.; Grundy, C.; Armstrong, B.; Casas, J. P.; Morris, R. W.; Wilkinson, P.; Lock, K.

Title, Section

Optimising Measurement of Health-Related Characteristics of the Built Environment: Comparing Data Collected by Foot-Based Street Audits, Virtual Street Audits and Routine Secondary Data Sources. Copyright: Creative Commons License.

Publication Year

2017

Journal Title

Health & Place

Volume

43

Issue

Jan

Pages

75-84

Availability

online

PMID

PMID: 27902960

DOI

10.1016/j.healthplace.2016.10.001

Abstract

mmc1.docx Appendix S1. ‚Older People‚ Environments and CVD Risk‚ (OPECR) tool mmc2.docx Appendix S2. Pearson correlation Between foot based street and Google Street View audits mmc3.docx (44K) Foot-based audit built environment Data mmc4.docx Appendix S4. Summary statistics for built environment, aesthetics, and land Use variables and Google Street View Quality Issues at segment level. Full text in Supplementary File on the website. The role of the neighbourhood environment in influencing health behaviours continues to be an important topic in public health research and policy. Foot-based street audits, virtual street audits and secondary data sources are widespread data collection methods used to objectively measure the built environment in environment-health association studies. We compared these three methods using data collected in a nationally representative epidemiological study in 17 British towns to inform future development of research tools. There was good agreement between foot-based and virtual audit tools. Foot based audits were superior for fine detail features. Secondary data sources measured very different aspects of the local environment that could be used to derive a range of environmental measures if validated properly. Future built environment research should design studies a priori using multiple approaches and varied data sources in order to best capture features that operate on different health behaviours at varying spatial scales.

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