Searchable Title

Canadian Diabetes Risk Assessment Questionnaire (CANRISK) (appears in: Piloting the CANRISK Tool in Vancouver Coastal Health.) Copyright: Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.

Searchable Authors

D Papineau
M Fong

Reference Type

Journal Article

Authors, Section

Papineau, D.; Fong, M.

Title, Section

Canadian Diabetes Risk Assessment Questionnaire (CANRISK) (appears in: Piloting the CANRISK Tool in Vancouver Coastal Health.) Copyright: Her Majesty the Queen in Right of Canada.

Publication Year

2011

Journal Title

Chronic Diseases and Injuries in Canada

Volume

32

Issue

1

Pages

12-18

Availability

online

PMID

PMID: 22153172

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Vancouver Coastal Health Authority's Healthy Living Program implemented this pilot study to test and validate the Canadian Diabetes Risk Assessment Questionnaire (CANRISK) developed by the Public Health Agency of Canada as a screening tool for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and prediabetes. Key objectives were to test the feasibility and acceptability of screening urban ethnic groups using the CANRISK, increase awareness of risk factors for DM and preDM and develop resources for lifestyle change. METHODS: The study recruited participants through community groups and churches, intraorganizational emails, primary care clinics and word of mouth. They completed the CANRISK and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) either individually or as part of a group. Groups received a brief diabetes prevention information session. Documents to support lifestyle change were distributed to all participants. RESULTS: Participants (n = 556) were recruited among East Asian, Caucasian, South Asian and Latin American ethnic groups. Of these, 17% had OGTT results in the preDM range and 3% in the DM range. Over 90% of participants reported that the CANRISK wording was clear and that they had received useful information about lowering their diabetes risk. CONCLUSION: The benefit of using an OGTT was in identifying 11% of the sample of participants who had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and did not show abnormal fasting plasma glucose (FPG) results. All participants with abnormal laboratory results were provided with follow-up educational interventions in their own language.

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