Searchable Title

Development and Validation of 'Sure': A Patient Reported Outcome Measure (Prom) for Recovery from Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Copyright: Joanne Neale, Silia Vitoratou, Emily Finch, Paul Lennon, Luke Mitcheson, Daria Panebianco, Diana Rose, John Strang, Til Wykes, John Marsden.

Reference Type

Journal Article

Authors, Section

Neale, J.; Vitoratou, S.; Finch, E.; Lennon, P.; Mitcheson, L.; Panebianco, D.; Rose, D.; Strang, J.; Wykes, T.; Marsden, J.

Title, Section

Development and Validation of 'Sure': A Patient Reported Outcome Measure (Prom) for Recovery from Drug and Alcohol Dependence. Copyright: Joanne Neale, Silia Vitoratou, Emily Finch, Paul Lennon, Luke Mitcheson, Daria Panebianco, Diana Rose, John Strang, Til Wykes, John Marsden.

Publication Year

2016

Journal Title

Drug and Alcohol Dependence

Volume

165

Issue

Aug 1

Pages

159-167

Availability

online

PMID

PMID: 27344196

DOI

10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.06.006

Abstract

Full text in Appendix A on the website. BACKGROUND: Patient Reported Outcome Measures (PROMs) assess health status and health-related quality of life from the patient/service user perspective. Our study aimed to: i. develop a PROM for recovery from drug and alcohol dependence that has good face and content validity, acceptability and usability for people in recovery; ii. evaluate the psychometric properties and factorial structure of the new PROM ('SURE'). METHODS: Item development included Delphi groups, focus groups, and service user feedback on draft versions of the new measure. A 30-item beta version was completed by 575 service users (461 in person [IP] and 114 online [OL]). Analyses comprised rating scale evaluation, assessment of psychometric properties, factorial structure, and differential item functioning. RESULTS: The beta measure had good face and content validity. Nine items were removed due to low stability, low factor loading, low construct validity or high complexity. The remaining 21 items were re-scaled (Rasch model analyses). Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses revealed 5 factors: substance use, material resources, outlook on life, self-care, and relationships. The MIMIC model indicated 95% metric invariance across the IP and OL samples, and 100% metric invariance for gender. Internal consistency and test-retest reliability were granted. The 5 factors correlated positively with the corresponding WHOQOL-BREF and ARC subscales and score differences between participant sub-groups confirmed discriminative validity. CONCLUSION: 'SURE' is a psychometrically valid, quick and easy-to-complete outcome measure, developed with unprecedented input from people in recovery. It can be used alongside, or instead of, existing outcome tools.

Share

COinS