This item is under embargo and not available online per the author's request. For access information, please visit http://libanswers.wustl.edu/faq/5640.

ORCID

http://orcid.org/https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7674-4119

Date of Award

Winter 12-15-2018

Author's School

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

Author's Department

Social Work

Additional Affiliations

Brown School

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Degree Type

Dissertation

Abstract

Adolescence is a critical period of development in its own right and can be more challenging for Black adolescents. The best strategies for assisting Black adolescents to navigate this time period and thrive are underdeveloped. This study examined the relationships among family support, Black identity, and everyday discrimination, perceived stress, self-efficacy, life satisfaction, and anxiety. Additionally, household income was explored as a moderator. The results suggest that family support and Black identity are both key to improved socioemotional outcomes and that increased financial well-being may provide additional benefits to Black adolescents.

Language

English (en)

Chair and Committee

Vetta Sanders Thompson

Committee Members

Garret Duncan, Shenyang Guo, Darrell Hudson, Michael Sherraden,

Comments

Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.7936/wfje-c361

Available for download on Friday, December 13, 2120

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Social Work Commons

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