This item is under embargo and not available online per the author's request. For access information, please visit http://libanswers.wustl.edu/faq/5640.

Date of Award

Spring 5-19-2016

Author's School

Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts

Author Department/Program

Graduate School of Art

Degree Name

Master of Fine Arts (MFA) in Visual Art

Degree Type

Thesis

Abstract

The 1962 work of structural anthropology The Savage Mind by Clause Levi- Strauss argues the position of the bricoleur, a resourceful artisan who relies

primarily on mystical thought and constructs using whatever materials are available. In this thesis I argue how my modes of making are parallel to those of the bricoleur, exploring the notion that science and mystical thought are equivalent approaches to understanding the world around us. By exploring aspects of nature, time and space, I invocate the ancient past through my references to indigenous cultures and insert my own experiences through the lens of my IPhone documented during daily rituals. I connect with my geographical home by sourcing local materials, and rely on intuition by tapping into my connection to nature and the cosmos. By blending ritual with a sculptural approach to making I curate both found and fabricated objects into carefully considered assemblages.

Language

English (en)

Program Director

Patricia J. Olynyk

Program Director's Department

Graduate School of Art

Committee Member

Michael Byron

Committee Member

Michael Byron

Committee Member

Jessica Baran

Committee Member

Jeffrey Uslip

Committee Member

Andrea Stanislav

Artist's Statement

The 1962 work of structural anthropology The Savage Mind by Clause Levi- Strauss argues the position of the bricoleur, a resourceful artisan who relies

primarily on mystical thought and constructs using whatever materials are available. In this thesis I argue how my modes of making are parallel to those of the bricoleur, exploring the notion that science and mystical thought are equivalent approaches to understanding the world around us. By exploring aspects of nature, time and space, I invocate the ancient past through my references to indigenous cultures and insert my own experiences through the lens of my IPhone documented during daily rituals. I connect with my geographical home by sourcing local materials, and rely on intuition by tapping into my connection to nature and the cosmos. By blending ritual with a sculptural approach to making I curate both found and fabricated objects into carefully considered assemblages.

Permanent URL: https://doi.org/10.7936/K7057D68

Available for download on Sunday, May 13, 2018

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