Author's School

Arts & Sciences

Author's Department

Biology

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-1994

Originally Published In

Goodenough, U. W. (1994). The religious dimensions of the biological narrative. Zygon, 29(4), 603-618. DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9744.1994.tb00693.x

Abstract

A cell/molecular biologist challenges the thesis that science and religion are two ways of experiencing and interpreting the world and explores instead the possible ways that the modern biological worldview might serve as a resource for religious perspectives. Three concepts—meaning, valuation, and purpose—are argued to be central to the entire biological enterprise, and the continuation of this enterprise is regarded as a sacred religious trust.

This article was originally delivered at the Templeton Symposium,„Science and Religion: Two Ways of Experiencing and Interpreting the World”organized by Zygon: Journal of Religion and Science and the Chicago Center for Religion and Science, 31 August-2 September 1993. This symposium and its publication were made possible through the generosity of the John Templeton Foundation.

Comments

This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: Goodenough, U. W. (1994). The religious dimensions of the biological narrative. Zygon, 29(4), 603-618, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9744.1994.tb00693.x. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Self-Archiving.

DOI

10.1111/j.1467-9744.1994.tb00693.x

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